The Everlasting Appeal of iPads: A Necessity-Driven Upgrade

A recent study conducted by Consumer Intelligence Research Partners (CIRP) has revealed a fascinating divergence in the behavior of iPad and iPhone owners when it comes to their old devices. While 67% of iPad users choose to keep or pass on their old iPads to family and friends, only 41% of iPhone users exhibit the same behavior.

This data, covering the twelve months leading up to March 2024, highlights the enduring desirability and usefulness of old iPads, even after they have been replaced. It also suggests that this strong affinity for older iPads reduces the urgency for iPad owners to upgrade to newer models.

On the other hand, iPhone users tend to trade in their old devices more frequently, taking advantage of the thriving secondary market and higher trade-in values. Almost half of iPhone upgraders opt to trade in their previous phones, while fewer than 10% of iPad upgraders choose this route.

Interestingly, the study also indicates that a larger proportion of old iPads, compared to old iPhones, find new homes with family members or friends. Approximately one-third of old iPads are handed down, while only 10% of old iPhones receive the same fate. This suggests that iPads continue to serve valuable household roles even after being replaced by newer models.

The reasons for upgrading also vary between iPads and iPhones. The report reveals that 23% of iPad upgraders replace their devices due to loss, theft, or damage, whereas only 6% of iPhone upgraders cite these reasons. This indicates that iPads are often replaced out of necessity rather than a desire to upgrade.

When it comes to upgrade cycles, it’s clear that iPad users tend to hold onto their devices for longer periods of time. Forty percent of iPad users wait three years or more before upgrading, and this trend has been steadily increasing in recent years. In contrast, the allure of trade-in options and a stronger trade-in market prompts iPhone users to upgrade more frequently.

Interestingly, the study also suggests that the secondary market for refurbished iPads is less developed compared to that for iPhones. This could be attributed to the high retained value that old iPads offer to their owners. While Apple may encourage customers to upgrade to the latest models for new features, the data demonstrates that many iPad upgrades are driven by necessity rather than desire.

In conclusion, the enduring appeal and usefulness of iPads, even after being replaced, has significantly impacted the upgrade behavior of iPad users. While iPhone users are more likely to trade in their old devices for newer models, iPad upgrades are often driven by necessity and a continued appreciation for the value these devices bring to households.

FAQ:

Q: What percentage of iPad users keep or pass on their old devices?
A: According to the study, 67% of iPad users choose to keep or pass on their old iPads to family and friends.

Q: How does this compare to iPhone users?
A: Only 41% of iPhone users exhibit the same behavior of keeping or passing on their old devices.

Q: What does this data suggest about iPad owners?
A: The data suggests that there is a strong affinity for older iPads among owners, which reduces the urgency for them to upgrade to newer models.

Q: How do iPhone users typically handle their old devices?
A: iPhone users tend to trade in their old devices more frequently, taking advantage of the thriving secondary market and higher trade-in values.

Q: What percentage of iPhone upgraders choose to trade in their previous phones?
A: Almost half of iPhone upgraders opt to trade in their old devices.

Q: How does this compare to iPad upgraders?
A: Only fewer than 10% of iPad upgraders choose to trade in their old devices.

Q: What is the difference in the proportion of old iPads and old iPhones finding new homes with family members or friends?
A: Approximately one-third of old iPads are handed down, while only 10% of old iPhones receive the same fate.

Q: What reasons do iPad upgraders cite for replacing their devices?
A: The report reveals that 23% of iPad upgraders replace their devices due to loss, theft, or damage.

Q: How does this compare to iPhone upgraders?
A: Only 6% of iPhone upgraders cite loss, theft, or damage as reasons for upgrading their devices.

Q: How long do iPad users typically wait before upgrading?
A: According to the study, 40% of iPad users wait three years or more before upgrading.

Q: Why do iPad users tend to hold onto their devices for longer periods of time?
A: The allure of trade-in options and a stronger trade-in market prompts iPhone users to upgrade more frequently, while iPad upgrades are often driven by necessity and a continued appreciation for the value these devices bring to households.

Key Terms:

1. CIRP: Consumer Intelligence Research Partners, the organization that conducted the study.
2. Secondary market: The market where used or pre-owned devices are bought and sold.
3. Trade-in: The act of exchanging an old device for a new one, often in return for a discounted price.
4. Refurbished: Devices that have been repaired or restored to work like new.
5. Retained value: The value that a device retains even after being used for some time.

Related links:
Apple iPad
Apple iPhone
Consumer Intelligence Research Partners (CIRP)